Patients and families

Opioid Addiction is a disease, not a moral failing.

You were strong enough to survive your addiction, and you’re more than strong enough to recover from it.

Send us a message or call (844) 535-7291 to get help now.

Whatever brought you to us, we’re glad you’re here

You’re starting your personal journey to recover. You might feel alone, but you’re about to find a whole team — an entire community — that is ready to welcome you. You might feel beaten up, but you aren’t beaten down. You got yourself here, and you still have fight left in you.

There’s a lot of work to do together, but we know you can do it. There is nothing wrong with you that can’t be fixed by what’s right with you.

We deliver real recovery.

real-recovery

Substance use disorder (commonly known as drug addiction) is recognized by the American Medical Association and other authorities as a medical disease that upsets normal brain function. Some have compared substance use disorder with other illnesses, such as diabetes — it doesn’t go away on its own, and only gets worse without proper treatment.

At Behavioral Health Group (BHG), we understand that the path of recovery from opioid abuse will look different for each individual. We don’t believe in treatment for treatment’s sake. Recovery is the goal, treatment is how you get there, and medication makes treatment possible.

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If you feel that you are wanting to take that step to better yourself, and have the things that you want in life, and do the things that you want, make a phone call to BHG. It will definitely change your life. It changed mine.

Nichole P.
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Our comprehensive approach

comprehensive-approach

BHG incorporates a breadth of services to meet patients where they are and stay with them on their recovery journey, connecting them to the appropriate resources and services to ensure they have every opportunity for success and well-being.

During the course of treatment and recovery, each patient requires a unique combination of services and treatment components. For example, in addition to counseling or psychotherapy, a patient may require medication, medical services, family therapy, parenting instruction, vocational rehabilitation, and/or social and legal services.

Our expansive counseling services and focus on case management deliver better guidance and consultation to patients and family members. Additionally, by offering OTP (opioid treatment programs) and OBOT (office-based opioid treatment) in multiple locations, we’re able to be flexible with medication types and how they’re administered.

Medication-assisted treatment

As part of a comprehensive treatment program, BHG can administer — or in some cases, prescribe — medications that are FDA approved for the treatment of opioid use disorder.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), “taking these medications as prescribed allows patients to hold jobs, avoid street crime and violence, and reduce their exposure to HIV by stopping or decreasing injection drug use and drug-related high-risk sexual behavior. Patients stabilized on these medications can also engage more readily in counseling and other behavioral interventions essential to recovery.”

It’s important to note that BHG provides comprehensive opioid use disorder recovery services, and offers medication — we are not “medication only.”

Some patients come to us knowing that they want medication, while others just know that they want to get better. If you’re not sure how you feel about medication, we’re ready to support your treatment and recovery in whatever way works for you.

Do Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) programs work?

Yes. Numerous research studies conducted over nearly 60 years have repeatedly shown that medications are effective in the treatment of opioid use disorder. Further, medications have been shown to help people stay in treatment so they have the opportunity to get into recovery.

Unfortunately, many people do not receive the treatment they need, either due to lack of access to providers, or due to misconceptions and stigmas about MAT programs.

Isn’t Medication-Assisted Treatment just substituting one drug for another?

This is a common misconception, but it doesn’t reflect the reality of what MAT actually does and how the medications work. When a patient receives MAT, they are moving from using opioids in an unsafe, destructive, and often illicit manner, to using a highly regulated medication that has been FDA approved for the specific purpose of treating addiction.

At BHG treatment centers, medication is administered under the care of trained physicians and medical professionals. Additionally, the medications used in our Medication-Assisted Treatment programs are pharmacologically different from commonly abused pain pills or heroin. These FDA-approved medications provide relief from the physical withdrawal symptoms and cravings associated with opioid dependence, while preventing the euphoric effects of other opioids.

Addiction counseling and therapy

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Support services such as counseling and behavioral interventions are fundamental components to all BHG programs. With the support provided by our counseling team and clinicians, patients learn how to better recognize triggers, develop coping skills, and improve their overall mental health.

Our counselors meet patients wherever they are in their journey and collaborate with them to create short-term and long-term goals as part of an individualized treatment plan.

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Behavioral therapy

Behavioral therapies vary in their focus and may involve addressing a patient’s motivation to change, providing incentives for abstinence, building skills to resist drug use, replacing drug-using activities with constructive and rewarding activities, improving problem-solving skills, and facilitating better interpersonal relationships.

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Group therapy

Group treatment is often preferred for people with opioid use disorder. It makes use of the need to belong and the healing power of human connections. The group helps patients feel less isolated and ashamed, and allows them to help themselves by helping others. Groups can provide both emotional support and confrontation, along with information and understanding.

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Individual therapy sessions

In individual therapy sessions, clients often dig deeper into the work done in group therapy, allowing them to spend more time on individual issues. Patients work with their dedicated counselor to build a close, honest relationship based on mutual trust and commitment to recovery.

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Family counseling

Where possible, it is important to enlist the patient's family. Relatives can be coached on how to confront the patient or taught how to facilitate cognitive and behavioral therapy. In a variant called network therapy, friends and relatives become part of the therapeutic team, meeting to discuss what to do in relapses and other emergencies.

Your questions, answered

Can opioid use disorder (OUD) be cured?

Like many chronic conditions, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or asthma, OUD is something that can be effectively treated and managed, rather than ‘cured.’ Many individuals find long-term stability and recovery through participation in medication assisted recovery combined with behavioral counseling.

What is “recovery”?

Addiction takes many things from people: their family, friends, jobs, their physical and mental health, their freedom. For some people, addiction takes everything.

Stopping substance use (getting sober) is just a piece of recovery, because simply… Read More

Addiction takes many things from people: their family, friends, jobs, their physical and mental health, their freedom. For some people, addiction takes everything.

Stopping substance use (getting sober) is just a piece of recovery, because simply not using substances won’t get back what you lost. Recovery is getting back what was taken, and then getting more. It isn’t about not doing something (like using substances), it’s about actively doing the things that help you live a full and fulfilling life. To get into recovery, people first need treatment.

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What is “treatment”?
When we say “treatment,” we are talking about the process that gives you the knowledge and skills you need to get into recovery. This includes group and individual counseling, as well as getting connected with healthcare services (and any other services you might need… Read More

When we say “treatment,” we are talking about the process that gives you the knowledge and skills you need to get into recovery. This includes group and individual counseling, as well as getting connected with healthcare services (and any other services you might need to heal).

Among other things, treatment teaches you:

  • About the brain disease of addiction and the substances that cause it
  • How your brain and your mind change over the course of addiction, and how to let it heal and change back
  • How to identify triggers that could lead to relapse and how to avoid them
  • Coping skills for getting through unavoidable, risky situations without relapsing
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What medications are used for Medication-Assisted Treatment?

There are three FDA-approved medications available for the treatment of opioid use disorder: methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone.

There is no scientific evidence showing that one medication is better than the others… Read More

There are three FDA-approved medications available for the treatment of opioid use disorder: methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone. 

There is no scientific evidence showing that one medication is better than the others. The most appropriate medication and dosage will be determined by the preferences and needs of the patient in consultation with one of our physicians.

At a proper dose, these medications do not make the person feel “drugged” or “high” like other opioids. Each dose lasts for at least 24 hours and significantly reduces drug cravings. While taking their medication as prescribed, many people say that they feel “normal” for the first time in a long time.

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What is methadone?
Methadone is an FDA-approved medication that has been used for decades to treat opioid use disorder. Methadone-assisted treatment for opioid addiction is the most researched and proven form of treatment, effective for producing positive outcomes for those struggling with… Read More

Methadone is an FDA-approved medication that has been used for decades to treat opioid use disorder. Methadone-assisted treatment for opioid addiction is the most researched and proven form of treatment, effective for producing positive outcomes for those struggling with opioid addiction. In fact, the World Health Organization includes methadone on its List of Essential Medicines.

The medication acts as a “full agonist” on opioid receptors within the brain and central nervous system which allows it to provide relief for severe withdrawal symptoms and helps “normalize” the brain chemistry to reduce cravings.

One of the things that sets methadone apart from other opioids is its long half-life. This means that the medication wears off much more gradually than other opioids such as morphine, fentanyl, or heroin. While the medication is able to provide relief for physical withdrawal symptoms and cravings, it blocks the euphoric high associated with other fast-acting opioids.

Because of its effectiveness, methadone-assisted treatment has been recognized as the “gold standard of care.”

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How do these medications work?
Methadone and buprenorphine both activate mu-opioid receptors (MORs) in the brain. However, unlike other opioids, they do so in a way that provides withdrawal symptom relief and curbs cravings while blocking the high associated with other opioids. Methadone is a “full… Read More

Methadone and buprenorphine both activate mu-opioid receptors (MORs) in the brain. However, unlike other opioids, they do so in a way that provides withdrawal symptom relief and curbs cravings while blocking the high associated with other opioids. Methadone is a “full agonist” that fully activates opioid receptors. Buprenorphine, a “partial agonist,” only partially activates opioid receptors, creating a ceiling on the medication’s effect. 

In contrast to these opioid agonists, naltrexone is an opioid antagonist that simply blocks opioid receptors rather than activating them. Since opioid antagonists do not activate opioid receptors, they do not provide relief for physical withdrawal symptoms or cravings, and require full detoxification before starting treatment.

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Which medications are used at BHG treatment centers?

The three FDA-approved medications for treating OUD are methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone. BHG is licensed to use all three to treat patients, depending on the type of program.

At BHG, buprenorphine is almost always provided as a combination medication with… Read More

The three FDA-approved medications for treating OUD are methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone. BHG is licensed to use all three to treat patients, depending on the type of program. 

At BHG, buprenorphine is almost always provided as a combination medication with the opioid antagonist naloxone. This combination is frequently marketed as Suboxone or Zubsolv, and is preferred by most regulatory bodies because it is less likely to be misused than buprenorphine alone.

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For how long will I need to take medication?
The short answer: long enough to rebuild healthy habits, repair relationships, and develop healthy coping strategies. Obviously, the amount of time this takes is different for everyone, and BHG does not have a “one size fits all” approach to our patients… Read More

The short answer: long enough to rebuild healthy habits, repair relationships, and develop healthy coping strategies. Obviously, the amount of time this takes is different for everyone, and BHG does not have a “one size fits all” approach to our patients. 

Some people find that medication still helps them long after they get back what they lost — and some continue to take medication indefinitely. If you find that you want to continue with the medication while you’re in recovery, we’ll be there to support you.

After treatment, some people decide to try a completely medication-free approach. If that’s what you want to do, your clinical team will work with you to help you safely make that move.

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How do people enter a BHG Treatment Program?
The work we do is heavily regulated by the federal and state government. This is a good thing, as it makes sure that the care people receive in licensed treatment programs is safe. BHG takes this a step further — all our programs are accredited by either the Joint Commission or… Read More

The work we do is heavily regulated by the federal and state government. This is a good thing, as it makes sure that the care people receive in licensed treatment programs is safe. BHG takes this a step further — all our programs are accredited by either the Joint Commission or CARF International, groups that hospitals and other healthcare organizations invite to ensure they meet the highest quality standards. 

Because of our high standards for care, there is some paperwork to do at the beginning. This process gives us the information we need to work with you to build an individualized and high-quality treatment plan.

First, you’ll have an assessment done by one of our counselors. The first assessment makes sure our program is right for you, and that we can meet your specific needs. There are also a physical health assessment and a physical exam and some laboratory tests we’ll need. If the program is right for you, you’ll get some medication and the process of treatment will be underway. Soon, you’ll have another assessment, designed to get to know you as an individual. The information you provide us over all these assessments will be used to create an individualized treatment plan (ITP).

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What is an ITP?
The individualized treatment plan (ITP) is your personal roadmap to recovery. It is the document you create with your counselor that lays out your short-term and long-term goals. The ITP describes what you want in recovery, then breaks the process down into steps that… Read More

The individualized treatment plan (ITP) is your personal roadmap to recovery. It is the document you create with your counselor that lays out your short-term and long-term goals. The ITP describes what you want in recovery, then breaks the process down into steps that we’ll take together to get you there. Through our work together, your ITP will be reviewed and updated as you accomplish your goals and make new ones. Remember: recovery is about getting back what addiction took, and then getting more.

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Does BHG provide outpatient opioid treatment?

All BHG treatment centers offer treatment in an outpatient setting. This allows the patient to receive treatment while they continue to live at home, attend work or school, and live a normal life.

Regular counseling sessions and doctor visits are cornerstones to all of our… Read More

All BHG treatment centers offer treatment in an outpatient setting. This allows the patient to receive treatment while they continue to live at home, attend work or school, and live a normal life. 

Regular counseling sessions and doctor visits are cornerstones to all of our programs. Certain programs also require on-site administration of medication. The frequency of on-site dosing is determined by federal and state regulations, direction from the doctor (with input from the treatment team), and the achievement of recovery milestones by the patient.

In addition to medical and behavioral treatment, BHG emphasizes abstinence from illicit substances. All patients are subject to scheduled and unscheduled drug tests, which are monitored by the clinic medical staff. This reduces the risk of relapse.

BHG’s approach is to “meet patients where they are” and offer the level of treatment that is appropriate for the challenges they are facing. Our treatments get more intense when people have more acute needs, and less intense when their clinical situation stabilizes. The goal is to partner with patients throughout their recovery journey, offering what they need when they need it.

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Does BHG have an intensive outpatient program?

BHG’s Comprehensive Outpatient Experience (COPE), provides patients with intensive outpatient support.

Patients can move fluidly through different levels of care — including both Standard… Read More

BHG’s Comprehensive Outpatient Experience (COPE), provides patients with intensive outpatient support. 

Patients can move fluidly through different levels of care — including both Standard and Motivational Enhancement programs — based upon their individual needs. For example, you might transition or step down to BHG’s COPE program after completion of an inpatient or residential rehab program.

In case of relapse, COPE can also be used as a tool to help you get back on track with your recovery.

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Are BHG treatment programs in-center or prescription-based?
At BHG, some treatment centers offer both in-center and prescription-based programs; others offer one program only. Choose what works best for your recovery with the help of your BHG physician, nurse, and counselor… Read More

At BHG, some treatment centers offer both in-center and prescription-based programs; others offer one program only. Choose what works best for your recovery with the help of your BHG physician, nurse, and counselor.

In either program, you’ll have the care and guidance of skilled clinicians and counselors and staff who respect you for having the courage and determination to fight back for your life through real recovery℠.

Here is a comparison of the two programs:

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* The decision on which program and medication to use for each patient is a medical decision made by patients in collaboration with their BHG physician, nurse, and counselor.

Outside providers such as primary care providers or emergency room providers will not be aware of patients taking methadone in an opioid treatment program without coordination of care. We do coordinate care with other providers if the patient gives consent so that all providers are aware of treatment, chronic medical problems, and other referrals.

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Does BHG do drug screening during treatment?
In addition to medical and behavioral treatment, BHG encourages abstinence from illicit substances. All patients receive scheduled and unscheduled drug tests, which are monitored by the clinic medical staff. Drug screening is not intended to be a punitive tool; rather, it… Read More

In addition to medical and behavioral treatment, BHG encourages abstinence from illicit substances. All patients receive scheduled and unscheduled drug tests, which are monitored by the clinic medical staff. Drug screening is not intended to be a punitive tool; rather, it helps ensure safe medication dosing, measurements of progress and accountability. This accountability, along with the constant support from the BHG medical and counseling teams, helps reduce the risk of relapse.

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How long will I be in treatment?

There is no specific length of time that is best for everyone, but the longer someone stays in treatment, the greater the chances for successful recovery.

As you progress through our program, you’ll need less treatment, and you’ll see us… Read More

There is no specific length of time that is best for everyone, but the longer someone stays in treatment, the greater the chances for successful recovery.

As you progress through our program, you’ll need less treatment, and you’ll see us back off as your life fills back up with normal and healthy things. If there is a slip or a relapse along the way, we’ll be there to help you through it by temporarily providing more treatment until the crisis passes.

For many patients, a continuing care approach provides the best results, with the treatment intensity varying according to a person’s changing needs. When the needs of the patients go beyond what we are able to address directly, we work to connect patients to appropriate supportive services within the community.

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Resources

For Patients
BHG Patient Journey
BHG Patient Journey

As a patient, you'll almost certainly need more treatment at the start to get stabilized and help you stop using. As you progress, you need less treatment, and you'll see us back off as your life fills back up with normal and healthy things. Download this helpful resource to learn more.

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Connecting to Care
Connecting to Care

BHG takes a patient-centered approach to treatment that helps each individual to take their life back. This includes evaluating their needs and connecting them to the appropriate resources and services to ensure they have every opportunity for success and well-being. Download this helpful resource to learn more. 

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Getting Started
Getting Started

Congratulations on making the step to take your life back from addiction! To maintain an addiction, and live through it, you have to be tough, determined and resourceful. That same toughness, determination and resourcefulness are there within you. Now is the time to put them to work to get you well instead of keeping you sick. Download this helpful resource to learn more.

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For Families
Helping Your Loved One
Helping Your Loved One

Drug addiction – officially called Substance Use Disorder – is recognized by the American Medical Association and other authorities as a medical disease that upsets normal brain function. Download this helpful resource to learn more. 

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Addiction & Mental Health
Addiction and Mental Health

Addiction and mental health disorders frequently happen in people at the same time. It can be difficult to know whether a mental health condition caused the addiction, if the addiction caused the mental health problem, or if they just occurred together by coincidence. Download this helpful resource to learn more.

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Points to Remember
Treatment Points to Remember

Treatment must help patients:

  • re-learn adaptive coping skills
  • re-fill life with meaningful moments
  • stop using drugs

Download this helpful resources to learn more. 

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Medication-Assisted Recovery℠ (MAR)
OUD Medications
How OUD Medication Works

The three FDA approved medications for treating Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) are methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone. Download this helpful resource to learn how medications used in the treatment of OUD work in the brain. 

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OUD Medication Fact Sheet
OUD Medication Fact Sheet

Methadone and buprenorphine are both opioid agonists, meaning they activate mu-opioid receptors in the brain. However, unlike other opioids, they do so in a way that provides withdrawal symptom relief and curbs cravings. Download this helpful resource to learn more. 

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Opioid Use Disorder and Other Medical Concerns
OUD & Pregnancy
Opioid Use Disorder and Pregnancy

While methadone and buprenorphine have both been shown to be safe and effective in pregnancy, there is a longer history, and more safety information about methadone. This is why methadone is considered “the gold standard” for OUD treatment in pregnancy. Download this helpful resource to learn more.

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OUD & HIV
Opioid Use Disorder and HIV

There is no scientific evidence that ongoing medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder is harmful to patients with HIV or
AIDS. Nor do any of the three FDA-approved MAR medications weaken the immune system or make the illness worse. Download this helpful resource to learn more. 

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OUD & Hepatitis C
Opioid Use Disorder and HCV

Hepatitis means the liver is irritated and inflamed. Several things can cause this including some viruses. One of these viruses is the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Download this helpful resource to learn more. 

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Access to personalized, outpatient treatment for opioid use disorder is now within easy reach.

Start your path to real recovery today by filling out the form or calling 844.535.7291.